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ausip:copyrightbackground [2019/03/10 11:40]
jessiej_87 edit
ausip:copyrightbackground [2019/04/03 17:50] (current)
101.165.131.90
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 Over the next 10 years the Stationers repeatedly advocated bills to re-authorise the old licensing system, but Parliament declined to enact them. Faced with this failure, the Stationers decided to emphasise the benefits of licensing to authors rather than publishers, and the Stationers succeeded in getting Parliament to consider a new bill. This new bill became the //Statute of Anne 1709//. Over the next 10 years the Stationers repeatedly advocated bills to re-authorise the old licensing system, but Parliament declined to enact them. Faced with this failure, the Stationers decided to emphasise the benefits of licensing to authors rather than publishers, and the Stationers succeeded in getting Parliament to consider a new bill. This new bill became the //Statute of Anne 1709//.
    
-//State of Anne 1709// was passed in 1710.  This was the first statute to regulate copyright through the government and courts, rather than through private parties. One of the foundations of this statute was the prescribed copyright term of 14 years, with a provision for renewal for a similar term, during which only the author (and the printers they chose to license their works) could publish the author'​s creations. Following this, the copyright in the works would expire, with the material falling into the public domain. The //Statute of Anne// remained in force until the //Copyright Act 1842// replaced it. The statute was an influence on copyright law in several other nations, including the United States, and even in the 21st century is considered to support the utilitarian justification for copyright law. +//Statute ​of Anne 1709// was passed in 1710.  This was the first statute to regulate copyright through the government and courts, rather than through private parties. One of the foundations of this statute was the prescribed copyright term of 14 years, with a provision for renewal for a similar term, during which only the author (and the printers they chose to license their works) could publish the author'​s creations. Following this, the copyright in the works would expire, with the material falling into the public domain. The //Statute of Anne// remained in force until the //Copyright Act 1842// replaced it. The statute was an influence on copyright law in several other nations, including the United States, and even in the 21st century is considered to support the utilitarian justification for copyright law. 
  
 In 1828, the UK enacted the //​Australian Court Act 1828// (UK) which in effect caused all the Acts (that were in force at the time) in the UK to be enforced within Australia. The UK copyright law was among these laws.  In 1828, the UK enacted the //​Australian Court Act 1828// (UK) which in effect caused all the Acts (that were in force at the time) in the UK to be enforced within Australia. The UK copyright law was among these laws. 
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